Monday, February 18, 2013

Common Side Effects of Asthma Inhalers and Ways to Prevent It

Asthma inhalers are prescribed to help open the airways of an asthma patient. To relieve the symptoms of asthma, your doctor may prescribe the use of an inhaler. Knowing your asthma medication side effects is an important part of caring for your asthma.

Albuterol is the generic form of inhalation medication, commonly prescribed. New brands have entered the market but haven’t penetrated to the extent Albuterol has. Inhaled albuterol and other beta-agonists can be dispensed as below:

  • Metered dose inhaler
  • Solution for nebulization
  • A powder-filled capsule that is inhaled using a powder inhaler

  common side effects of asthma inhalers

A number of side effects with an albuterol inhaler should be reported to your asthma doctor as soon as possible. Side Effects are: Dry mouth, irritated throat, dizziness, headache, light-headedness, heartburn, loss of appetite, altered taste sensation, restlessness, anxiety, nervousness, trembling, and sweating may occur but should subside as your body adjusts to the medication. If inhaled steroids are taken at lower doses they have lesser side effects. If higher doses are consumed, there is a possibility of yeast infection in the mouth.

Short-acting albuterol and other beta-agonists should not be used regularly for the control of asthma. People who might benefit from being placed on an inhaled steroid like Flovent or Pulmicort or a combination agent like Advair include those who:

  • Awake from cough more than 2 nights per month
  • Use a reliever inhaler more than twice per week
  • Have asthma symptoms more than twice per week
  • Have symptoms that interfere with their daily activities

Albuterol inhalers have been studied thoroughly in clinical trials, in which a group of people taking the drug have side effects documented and compared to another group not taking the medicine. This way, it is possible to see what side effects occur, how often they appear, and how they compare to the group not taking the medicine.

Source: www.cdc.gov